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Dogs of the Deadlands: SHORTLISTED FOR THE WEEK JUNIOR BOOK AWARDS

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The Carnegie medal winner McGowan is superb at stories about children who do not have all the advantages.’ Sunday Times Chernobyl, 1986. Natasha’s world is coming to an end. Forced to evacuate her home in the middle of the night, she must leave her puppy behind and has no idea if she’ll ever return. Some time later, growing up in the shadow of the ruined nuclear power plant, pups Misha and Bratan have to learn how to live in the wild—and fast. Creatures with sharp teeth, claws, and yellow eyes lurk in the overgrown woods. And they’re watching the brothers’ every move… Growing up in the shadow of the ruined nuclear power plant, pups Misha and Bratan need to learn how to live wild - and fast. Creatures with sharp teeth, scythe-like claws and yellow eyes lurk in the overgrown woods. And they’re watching the brothers… I'm not sure if I could believe though that loss of a puppy would have such drastic consequences and result in a person being so reclusive with no relationships whatsoever well into the adulthood. Don't get me wrong, I know how sensitive children are, but it seemed too much.

Dogs of the Deadlands Keith Robinson Illustration - Dogs of the Deadlands

Lavie Tidhar Interviewed by Lucian Hudson Maror: Bloody Tale of the Making of a Nation Exeter College: Marquee 4:00pm Sun 2 Sunday, 2 April 2023 See this event Anthony McGowan Dogs of the Deadlands Exeter College: Marquee 10:00am Sun 2 Sunday, 2 April 2023 See this event Dogs of the Deadlands: THE TIMES CHILDREN'S BOOK OF THE WEEK by Anthony McGowan asks about several topics and themes, such as companionship, nature vs nurture, and the power of hope. Aimed at a younger audience, it joins this rich seam of literature and surely deserves to become a timeless classic too.

It’s April 1986 and, not far from the Chernobyl nuclear plant, a little girl can’t sleep. It’s her 7 th birthday and today her greatest wish came true. The puppy she had always dreamed of is finally hers and she is overcome with excitement and love. Amidst the gore and trauma is a remarkable and intimate story of loyalty and love, resilience, survival and hope.

DOGS OF THE DEADLANDS | Kirkus Reviews

Anne Katrin Schlag and Alex Stevens Chaired by Stephen Law Oxford Debate. Drug Policy: Are Politicians Following the Evidence or Ignoring It? Oxford Martin School: Lecture Theatre 2:00pm Sun 2 Sunday, 2 April 2023 See this event Sarah Bakewell Humanly Possible: 700 years of Humanist Freethinking, Enquiry and Hope Exeter College: Marquee 12:00pm Sun 2 Sunday, 2 April 2023 See this eventAntonio Munoz Molina Interviewed by Boyd Tonkin To Walk Alone in the Crowd CANCELLED Bodleian: Divinity School 12:00pm Sun 2 Sunday, 2 April 2023 See this event Every literary festival stays in an author’s mind for slightly individual reasons. I shall remember the Oxford festival for: Emily Thomas The Meaning of Travel: Philosophers Abroad Oxford Martin School: Seminar Room 4:00pm Sun 2 Sunday, 2 April 2023 See this event Carnegie-winning novelist Anthony McGowan talks about his new book Dogs of the Deadlands, set in the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Steeped in Richard Adams’ Plague Dogs and Watership Down, yet wearing all the hallmarks of Barry Hines at his finest, Dogs of the Deadlands is a wonderful thing. It moved me and stayed with me for an awfully long time.’ Phil Earle, author of When the Sky Falls

Dogs of the Deadlands: SHORTLISTED FOR THE WEEK JUNIOR BOOK

Zoya is one such puppy, a Samoyed left behind by a traumatised little girl, taken away to the city and promised a swift return which never comes. It also shows us Misha, born in the wild to a dog and raised among savagery and Darwinian 'survival of the fittest' principles. Twelve-year-old Lily has lived with her emotionally distant oncologist stepfather and a succession of nannies since her mother died in a car accident two years ago. Nannies leave because of the difficulty of caring for Adam, Lily’s severely autistic 4-year-old half brother. The newest, Suzanne, seems promising, but Lily is tired of feeling like a planet orbiting the sun Adam. When she meets blind Zoe, who will attend the same private middle school as Lily in the fall, Lily’s happy to have a friend. However, Zoe’s take on the plight of the captive dolphin, Nori, used in Adam’s therapy opens Lily’s eyes. She knows she must use her influence over her stepfather, who is consulting on Nori’s treatment for cancer (caused by an oil spill), to free the animal. Lily’s got several fine lines to walk, as she works to hold onto her new friend, convince her stepfather of the rightness of releasing Nori, and do what’s best for Adam. In her newest exploration of animal-human relationships, Rorby’s lonely, mature heroine faces tough but realistic situations. Siblings of children on the spectrum will identify with Lily. If the tale flirts with sentimentality and some of the characters are strident in their views, the whole never feels maudlin or didactic.

More books by Anthony McGowan

I'm hoping McGowan has a comic or light-hearted book lined up for us next, I'm sure he needs it as much as we do!

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